Antique Chinese Porcelain collector's help and info page, Ming, dynasty, Chinese porcelain marks

Dictionary and Glossary Home Search Gotheborg.com site for:

Gadroon

Gadroons or godroons (noun) are an ornamental band of lobes that are convex or alternating convex and concave, molding carved with ornamental beading or reeding. This curving decoration is often applied as an edging to curved surfaces especially on silver but also found on porcelain.

In European porcelain 'Gadroon' was first introduced at Spode in about 1824. The shape copied the elegant shapes in Georgian silver wares. It was particularly used for teawares and elaborate dessert services.

In 1824 one famous service was made by Spode in this shape for the Honourable East India Company. This replaced an earlier Chinese porcelain service which were to have been destroyed by fire in their warehouse in Canton in 1822. In his book Spode Leonard Whiter says 'this must be the unlikeliest order in the whole history of ceramics. That the world's largest trafficker in Chinese porcelain should come to Staffordshire when it required ware for Canton is almost incredible'. He goes on to say that after the fire in 1822 permission was given in London for the premises in Canton to be rebuilt and refurnished. The archives of the India Office record that on 18th September 1824 a payment of 476 15s 6d was made to Messrs Spode and Copeland for porcelain under the heading of 'Factory Stores and Petty Merchandise'.

It is also known that a large proportion of the Honourable East India Company's Chinese porcelain went down with the Diana. Considering the difficulties in communication of this time there might have been some mixup's about the cause of the loss of the Company's Chinese porcelain. Occational shipwrecks probably didn't help.

See also Flute

HOME

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z