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Japanese Porcelain Marks

Satsuma

Satsuma Jar

Large Satsuma vase depicting the seven gods of good fortune. Height: 38 cm. Mark: Dai Nihon Satsuma Gyokusen zo. Meiji period, circa 1880s.
Photo: Curtesy Ian and Mary Heriot Coll., New Zealand 2019.

The typical Satsuma ware we most of the time comes into contact with is a yellowish earthenware usually decorated with a minute decoration with Japanese figures, expressive faces or detailed oriental landscapes, or sometimes embellished with vivid dragons in relief. This ware is in fact an export product specifically designed in the mid 19th century to cater to the western export market. The Japanese themselves had very little interest in this ware.

From around the 1890s to the early 1920s more than 100 artist at least twenty larger studios or factories were producing "Satsuma" wares of which much were of low quality and destined for the European and American export markets. Most of the marks below will detail this latter wares since this is what we see most of.

At the same time, other artists were producing exquisite wares of the highest quality. There were many masterpieces created during its heyday and several studios have created eternal fame for their names with these magnificent wares. Most high quality export 'Satsuma' is easily recognized by its finely crackled glaze and by the fact that its yellowish earthenware body does not "ring" when tapped. The production soon spread to several cities such as Kyoto, Tokyo, Nagoya, Yokohama and elsewhere throughout Japan, from the Meiji period (1868-1912) up until today.

Wares of the Original Satsuma Han

The original Satsuma Han however has a much longer history than that. If you click the map icon to the right you will find this as the Satsuma area on the southern Kyushu island. The first historical kilns here were established by Korean potters in the late 16th century. These first wares were a massive and hard stoneware, covered with a thick dark glaze, a ware that are so rare that only museums might have a few to show.

The circle with a cross that often make up a part of the marks, are the Shimazu mon or the family crest of the clan that ruled Satsuma Han however I doubt that any one of the Shimazu clan ever owned or, let alone ordered one Satsuma export style ware piece to be made. If that however had been the case, the crest would in that case been blue, since that was also the Shimazu clan colors.

Satsuma export decorative style

The success of the Satsuma export decorative style inspired many followers, some of which have a stoneware body or one of pure white porcelain. Just to make it easier for the interested collector to find his way to the information offered here, I have chosen to collect any and all Satsuma looking wares, here.

Ceramics bearing the Satsuma Kamon were made well outside of the borders of Kyushu. Items for export were often decorated with obscure and unrelated themes chosen for their drama and exoticism. These wares thus inspired a whole design movement in the West known as Japonism.

Satsuma was produced in Kagoshima, Kyoto, Tokyo, Osaka, Kobe, and Kanazawa by hundreds of known artists, in many styles and by literally thousands of unknown decorators. Meizan has pieces authenticated as being done in Kanazawa (Kutani). For most of the "Zan brothers" (marks incorporating the Japanese character for mountain = zan) nothing is known. In spite of very good quality work, many good pieces are simply unmarked.

The colour Gosu Blue is found on a type of Satsuma which used to be called Imperial Satsuma circa late 19 century. Gosu Blue is distinctive with a very thick glaze that can be either dark blue, green or black depending on the firing. "Satsuma Gosu Blue" was produced in very limited quantity in Kyoto in the mid-19th century, and is now the most sought after of the Satsuma wares.

A comment on Kyoto or Awata wares as compared to Satsuma ware is that pieces manufactured in Awata near Kyoto, after the Edo period, are all called Kyoto Satsuma. Later on, Satsuma style wares was also produced in Yokohama and Tokyo. The paste and glaze is probably the same as on Satsuma ware while the style of decoration is different. Sandra Andacht, in her Treasury of Satsuma book, quotes a 19th century visitor to the Kinkozan factory, saying that "the same glazed pots were decorated in two styles, the one being called Kyoto or Awata ware, and the other Satsuma".

Please also notice that the authenticity of many of the more important marks below are uncertain.

Jan-Erik Nilsson

Introductory text written by and together with several expert members of the Gotheborg Discussion Board

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Satsuma or Satsuma Yaki, generic marks
Generic Satsuma marks refer to marks added to a Japanese ceramic piece to indicate a style in general instead being the name of a specific company, studio or any individual artist.
1244. Koro. Mark: Satsuma yaki under the Shimazu family crest. As all the blue, including the mark, is Gosu blue, Presumed date to the earlier part of the Meiji period, around 1880 or thereabouts.

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1306. Mark: Shimazu family crest and below that Satsuma Yaki, the last character in Satsuma is abbreviated. Date: Probably latter part of the Meiji (1868-1913) period.
367. Satsuma. Mark: Shimazu family crest; Satsuma; [last character is abbreviated]. 20th cent.
1265. Mark. Satsuma tsukuru.

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342. Mark: Satsuma under the Shimazu family crest. Taisho period (1912-1926).
927. Mark: Satsuma in Japanese hiragana characters (their native syllabary).
61. Mark: Satsuma, modern mark dated 1979. Imported by, or ordered by the Arnart Import Company.
417. Mark: Satsuma, modern mark, c. 1980s.

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1259. Mark, stamped Satsuma under the Shimazu family crest, c. 1947. These were mass produced during this time and sold to western military personnel on the bases and to visitors and tourists.

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Baikei (see also: Nakamura Baikei)
Baiko
Bankozan
Banzan
Beizan

Bizan
This mark reads Bizan where 'Bi' = Utsukushi = Beautiful. This Bizan is one of several workshops working for the export industry of the time. It is also not Shimizu Bizan of Kutani fame whose work is extraordinary. There were a number of Bizans working over the years.
343. Bizan, Taisho period (1912-1926)
1331. Tea or coffe set. Mark: Bizan under the Shimazu family crest. Taisho period (1912-1926) or sligtly later.

Chikusai

Chin Jukan
Chin Jukan (Jukan zo, Jukan sei, Gyokuzan zo) occurs under many signatures. Most important was Chin Jukan XII (1835-1906) who was the founding father of the satsuma industry in Kagoshima, Satsuma province. He exhibited at many international exhibitions during the years 1873-1906. The factory produced blanks for Satsuma decorators across Japan, notably Yabu Meizan and Gyokushu. Chin also used the name Gyokuzan between 1874-1897. Other artists are Chin Jukan XIV (1926-), (Satsuma Jukan sei) and Chin Jukan XV (1959-)

Chineike
Chinzan
Chokuzan

Choshuzan
Choshuzan, alternative reading ZHO (or naka), SHU and ZAN (yama). Large factory producing low to middle quality wares. Often complex marks including Dai Nippon and name of individual potter. One of the most common marks on Kyoto Satsuma dragonware during the second half of the Meiji period (1868-1912) is that of Choshuzan, mostly in conjuction with another artist and some kind of commendatory mark such as respectfully made. Marks can in addition to Choshuzan have Dai Nippon (Great Japan), Satsuma Koku, Jissei in, Choshuzan saku (made), Kagetsu hitsu (decorated).
1267. Tea cup and saucer, Kyoto Satsuma ware, Mark: Choshuzan. Decoration of dragons with white slip (moriage) on a heavy gilded ground, often referred to as dragonware. Date second half of the Meiji period (1868-1912).

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592. Satsuma. Mark: The three top characters read, from right to left - Dai Nippon. The four characters in the centre read Satsuma, Jitsu Sei. The three on the right read Choshuzan i.e. the potter, and the three on the left, Kagetsu Ga - painter. The large square character seems to read either Maru, or Tsubaru meaning round or circular, it may be a studio mark. Date: probably from the later part of the Meiji (1868-1912) period.

Daimyo
1435. Satsuma. Mark: Right colum: Dai Nippon. Middle column of 3 characters is best written as "Satsu ma (shortened form) yaki", rather than "Satsu ma sho", so "Satsuma ware". The decorator's name has just 2 characters, I think best written as Daimyo (perhaps, in this sense, meaning "great reputation"), with the LH column then reading "Daimyo made". Likely date, around 1900.

Dozan
Eizan

Eizan Kawamoto.
Specialized in large pieces carved in high relief.

Fujisan
Fujisan 1555. Satsuma. Mark: Fujisan. Likely date around 1910-20.

Fukiya
703. Mark: Fuki-ya. A company name.

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Fukyu
Furukawa

Futaji
444. Satsuma. Mark: Shimazu family crest; Possible reading Futaji. Before 1920.
1529. Satsuma style Moriage Dragon Ware Tea Set. Mark: Shimazu family crest above two character mark possible reading Futaji. First half 20th century.

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Fuzan
461. Satsuma. Mark: Kyoto Fuzan = "Kyoto, Maple Mountain". Meiji period (1868-1912)

Fuzan Ryun
1162. Satsuma. Mark: Fuzan. Tentative date due to family history, around 1913.

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Gaho 雅峯
Jukomine Satsuma 1565. Mark: Gaho. Tentative date: Late Meiji 1895-1912
Jukomine 1564. Mark: Gaho, where the first part of the name have been rubbed off. The signature have the same seal (of which the reading is doubtful) as mark 1565. This vase with its gosu blue enamel, appear to have originated from Kagoshima, rather than Kyoto or the other "mainland" centers. The general thinking about Satsuma with gosu blue in the decoration suggests late Edo or early Meiji (say 1850-1880). However, on our Discussion Board, some scholars have advocated for a later date, generally expressed as late Meiji (say post 1890).

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Gassan
Genzan
Getsugeppo
Gikohin

Gyokusen
Gyokusen Satsuma 1569. Mark: Dai Nihon Satsuma Gyokusen zo. Large Satsuma vase depicting the seven gods of good fortune, height: 38 cm. Meiji period (1868-1913), ca 1880. Ian and Mary Heriot Coll., New Zealand 2019.

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Gyokusenzan

Gosuido
433. Mark: Gosuido. Early to mid 20th century.

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Gyokuzan 玉 山 (Jade Mountain)

Older spellings are Giokozan (Brinkley, 1900) and Giokuzan (Bowes, 1882). Depending on the age of the piece and actual artist, the family name Chin Jukan also occurs.

Chin Jukan (Jukan zo, Jukan sei, Gyokuzan zo)

Chin Jukan XII (1835-1906) was the founding father of the satsuma industry in Kagoshima, Satsuma province. He exhibited at many international exhibitions during the years 1873-1906. The factory produced blanks for Satsuma decorators across Japan, notably Yabu Meizan and Gyokushu. Chin also used the name Gyokuzan between 1874-1897.

Chin Jukan XIV (1926-) (Satsuma Jukan sei)

Chin Jukan XV (1959-)

1561. Mark: Gyokuzan. Tentative date; mid 20th century.

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451. Satsuma. Mark: Gyokuzan. Shimazu family crest above cartouche. No 451. The right cartouche reads "Gyokuzan". The left deserves a separate description. Meiji period (1868-1912).
454. Satsuma. Mark: Gyokuzan. Shimazu circular crest above inscription. The three characters to the right read: Satsuma-yaki. Suggested reading of the left column despite a possibly error / extra "zan" character: Satsuma yaki, dai ni [hon], Gyokuzan
364. Mark: Gyokuzan, gold mark with separate 'mon' on dull gold. Meiji period (1868-1912)
341. Gyokuzan, gold mark on red
363. Gyokuzan, gold mark. Meiji period (1868-1912)
366. Gyokuzan, gold mark on two coloured flower bud. (Does not show mark, accept as correct) Early Meiji period (1868-1912).
1339. Mark: Satsuma, Gyokuzan zo. Porcelain ewer "dragonware" on crackled Kyoto Satsuma style porcelain ware. Mid 20th century.

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Gyozan
1137. Mark: The mark reads Gyozan Sei Zo (Sei = to 'make' or 'manufacture'; Zo = 'to create') The marks indicate that the pottery was produced and decorated by Gyozan, Kyoto pottery. The red mark is the kakihan which often appears of ware by this family of potters. Tentative date around 1920s.

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1504. Mark: Satsuma Gyozan

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Hakuzan - White Mountain
820. Mark: Hakuzan 白 山 under Shimazu family crest. Probably mid 20th century.

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Hayakawa, Kyoto
1506. Mark: Circular Shimazu family crest above a cartouche with the makers signature, Hayakawa. Japan, Kyoto, Meiji period (1868-1912).

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Hayakawa 1563. Satsuma. Mark: Hayakawa zo (made). Taisho period (1912-1926) or thereabout.

Hamada
Hankinzan
Harukawa
Hasegawa
Hattori

Hekizan
446. Satsuma. Mark: Shimazu family crest above a cartouche, reading: Satsuma Hekizan. The two characters to the right read "Satsuma". The bottom left is usually written as "zan", rather than "yama". Taisho period (1912-1926).

Hidemassa

Hododa 保土田

On some Japanese Satsuma wares the thee kanji characters 保土田 occurs in the mark. The middle character 土, can be read as to or do while 保 ho and 田 ta are pretty much fixed. While several readings are possible, Hododa is the most common among collectors. For the purpose of this marks page I have then settled for the Hododa transcription.

While I have no firm data to back this up, it has been suggested it is a safe guess that the Hodota signature is a late Edo / Meiji period Yokohama merchant name and not that of any particular studio or pottery family. Various porcelain carries this name separate or in combination with others in their marks, of which some are listed below. Lawrence I believe have this as "Hododa Biten or Hododa Meizan (Hododa company, large company in Yokohama)"

356. Shimazu family crest; cartouche reads Meizan Hododa. Meiji period (1868-1912).
453. Satsuma. Mark: "Hododa". Shimazu family crest above cartouches. Reading top to bottom, right to left the top cartouche is: Dai Nippon, Bi jutsu. The lower cartouche is: Satsuma, Hododa. Meiji period (1868-1912).
470. Satsuma. Artist signature: "Hododa". Mark:

Shimazu family crest above cartouche. Dai Nippon Satsuma Hododa. If considered, two further characters at the bottom left and center. While unsure, I think they say tsukuru kore (i.e. made this). Therefore (reading top to bottom, right to left) the full mark might read: Dai Nippon, Satsuma, Hododa made this. Meiji period (1868-1912)

1074. Satsuma. Artist signature: "Hododa". Mark:

Shimazu family crest above cartouche. Dai Nippon Satsuma Hododa. The full mark might read: Dai Nippon, Satsuma, Hodota made this. Meiji period (1868-1912).

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889. Mark: Top to bottom, left to right, it reads Dai Nippon ? zan (shimazu mon) Satsu ma yaki, Ho do da sei. Meaning: "(made in) Great Japan (by) ? zan, Satsuma ware, manufactured (by) Hododa." The artist name is possibly the bottom two characters on the right (? san). "Hodata (unconfirmed info supplied) was a large Tokyo producer which made many pieces in this style early in the 20th C."

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1085. Mark: Under the circular Shimazu clan mark, Dai Nippon, Yokohama, Satsuma yaki, Hododa, Kinzo or tutushinde meaning 'respectfully made'.

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Hogetsu
Hogetsuzan

Honkoku
1266. Bowl. Mark reads Honkoku Sei or Made by Honkoku. Early 20th century.

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Horaiken
Horindo, see Hogetsu

Hozan, Matsumoto
1562. Mark: Hozan, under the Yasuda trademark. When signed in full it reads Matsumoto Hozan. Some of his work is of very high quality.

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Hyakushuko
Hyokoseki

Hyozan
474. Satsuma. Hyozan or Hiozan. Taisho period (1912-1926)

Ichiten
Ichizan
Ippo
Iwaida
Izumiyama

Ji, Kyoto Satsuma
1341. Pair of vases, Kyoto style Satsuma. Marks: Japanese kanji Ji This symbol occurs on both these vases plus that on one we also find the word nigi "Right" 右. It is not difficult to suggest a meaning of the mark as that one of the vases should be shown on the right hand side. Tentative date 1920-30.

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Jinzan
1062. Mark: The Shimazu clan mark (Satsuma) above Jin-zan

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Jitsu
892. Koro, with decoration of "Arhats" (sages) etc., Mark: Dai Nippon, jitsu hin, satsuma yaki. Date: Late Meiji 1895-1912

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Jukan, see Chin
Juko
Jukomine
Jusetsu
Jusho

Juzan
455. Satsuma. Mark: Juzan. The third character is a seal or the kakihan of the artist

Kaburagi

Kaizan
Likely to be a commissioning agent and not a manufacturer

Kanzan
See also Kyoto Tojiki Goshigaisha

Katsuyama

Kazan
346. Shimazu family crest; cartouche reads Kazan. Taisho period (1912-1926).

Keichozan

Keida
1065. Mark: Keida. The mark appears to read "Satsuma" "Keida" with a Kakihan, ie the red mark at the bottom, an unreadable mark of the artist/potter. Tentative date around 1920s.

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Keigaku
Keichozan
Kenrai
Kikkoen

Kinkozan Sobei
The Kinkozan family have been associated with pottery since 1645. They went on to become the largest producer of Satsuma ware, from the end of the 19th century until 1927 after which the factory closed. By the 1850s Kobayashi Sobei (1824-84), Kinkozan Sobei (artist name Kinkozan IV), started to export his products together with the Kyoto manufacturer Taizan VIII. The market was in particular America. Their main production period was approximately between 1875-1927 under the leadership of Kinkozan V (1868-1927). Regarding styles, in her book Treasury of Satsuma, Sandra Andacht quotes a 19th century visitor to the Kinkozan factory, saying that the same glazed pots were decorated in two styles, the one being called Kyoto or Awata ware, and the other Satsuma.
1447. Vase. Mark: Kinkozan tsukuru. Meiji (1868-1913) period.

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448. Satsuma. Kinkozan.
449. Satsuma. Kinkozan tsukuru.
456. Satsuma. Kinkozan tsukuru.
452. Satsuma. Mark: Kinkozan.
875. Mark: Kinkozan tsukuru. Date uncertain.

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1241. Vase, height 5 inch / 12.5 cm. Mark: Kinkozan tsukuru. Date early 1920s. The vase is one of a pair.

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1551. Square Vase. Mark: Kinkozan tsukuru. Tentative date 1920s.

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1241. Vase, height 5 inch / 12.5 cm. Mark: Kinkozan tsukuru. This vase is marked with a sticker on the base saying 1934, it is however not known if this is a date. According to the family history it might be the year of acquisition.

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1064. Mark: Kinkozan. Perhaps near turn of the century or slightly before. In the book "Treasury of Satsuma" there seems to be several similar illustrated dated to ca. 1885-1900.

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Kinryuzan
Kinsei Kiowa
Kinseizan
Kintozan
Kinzan

Kitamura Yaichiro
1571. Mark: Kitamura Yaichiro. Mentioned in Master Potter of Meiji Japan Makuzu Kozan and his workshop, by Clare Pollard.

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Kizan
1556. Mark: Kizan under the Shimazu family crest, a cross within a circle.

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359. Mark: ? KIZAN, gold mark on red
360. Mark: ? KIZAN, gold mark on black
362. Mark: Kizan, gold mark in double gold lines. characters to right illegible. Meiji period (1868-1912)
582. Dai Nippon, Kizan, Tsukuru - "Great Japan, Kizan, (artist). made". It is generally accepted that marks that includes "Dai Nippon" in Japanese characters on the whole date to the Meiji (1868-1912) period, reflecting the greatly increased nationalism of that period. This mark Meiji period, around 1880 - 1900.

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Kobaien
Koseki

Koshida
Koshida seems to have been a prolific maker of Satsuma from at least the 1880,s. Much of their production was decorated by some of the best artists and bears their marks as well as Koshida's. Koshida would have closed about the same time as the Kinkozan factory and the business seems to have reopened post war, either by a family member or by someone simply using a well known name as a cachet.
1262. Vase. Mark: Koshida. Date likely to be 1950s or later.

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457. Satsuma. Koshida. This is a company, rather than artist, name. Taisho period (1912-1926)
1307. Mark: Koshida under the Shimazu family crest. This is a company, rather than artist, name.
1242. Bowl, Kyoto Satsuma ware, Mark: Koshida. Bowl dated Kyoto 1959.

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1263. Moon flask, height 8 1/2 inch, signed Koshida + Suizan.

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Koshuzan
Kotoen

Kozan 光山 Light Mountain
Kozan Zo 1559. Mark, from right to left: Dai Nippon ... Kozan Zo 光山 (light).
Dai Nippon Kozan Zo 1560. Satsuma tea bowl, by Kozan. Mark: Dai Nippon Kozan Zo. Not to be confused with Makuzu (Miyagawa) Kozan 1842-1916 This mark is that of Kozan, a Kyoto artist/maker who uses the character Ko=light 光 as opposed to Makuzu who uses the character Ko meaning fragrance.
459. Satsuma. Dai Nihon, Kozan zo with the character Ko=light 光. Meiji period (1868-1912)

Kozan
For Makuzu Kozan, se below.
1530. Mark: Kozan. Bowl in moriage decoration. On the base a paper label 日本陶磁器工业组合聯合會 "Nihon Tojiki Kogyo Kumiai Rengokai" which is a inspection certificate (#4) From this association, based in Nagoya. It is still active and was operating at least as early as the 1930s. Name in English would be "Federation of Japan Pottery Manufacturers' Co-operative Associations" (http://www.toujiki.org/kyoren/shozaiti.html). In the center: 合格 gokaku "passed inspection". The Red stamp reads 輸格 meaning "export quality". Date: Mid 20th century.

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469. Mark: Kozan. Porcelain with moriage decoration in 'Satsuma' style.
458. Satsuma. "Kozan".
352. "Kozan". Meiji period (1868-1912)
358. "Kozan. The characters read Kozan sei, Kyoto. Meiji period (1868-1912).
476. Satsuma. Kozan in upper cartouche, Takezan in lower. Meiji period (1868-1912)
934. Mark: The Shimazu clan mark (Satsuma) above Kyozan or alternatively Kozan, as artist name. Kyozan Zo meaning "Kyozan made (this)". Mark has several alternative readings for first character, and a loose translation of both is "fragrant mountain". Common Satsuma motif. Pattern is usually in Moriage (raised enamels)style. Date: 1860-1910

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1540. Bowl. Mark: Kozan Sei meaning "Kyozan made (this)".

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1572. Bowl. Mark: Kozan. Mark has several alternative readings for first character.

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Kununzan

Kyokuzan - Morning Sun Mountain
Kyokuzan which could be literally translated to Morning Sun Mountan is know on both typical Satsuma earthenware body as well as white porcelain, some signed 'Kutani', why while possibly a potter, this might rather be a shop or company name.
1207. Dish. Mark is Kyokuzan. A known artist mark, but not much else is known. Tentative date around 1910-20.

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1211. Pin dish, for a lady's dressing table. Mark is Kyokuzan. Date around 1920-35.

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1217. Koro. Mark is Kyokuzan. Shimazu family crest (mon), a cross within a circle. The characters below read Satsuma yaki with the second character abbreviated. The character to the left may be an honorific and the whole could read something like "Fine pottery of Satsuma". It is not signed but has the seal Ki or Yoshi written in Sosho style within a circle. Early Meiji (1868-1912) period.

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Kyoto Tojiki Goshigaisha
Kyokichi
Kyozan
Kyozan, Zekou
Kyuzan

Kozan, Makuzu Miyagawa (1842-1916)
Makuzu porcelain manufacture Miyagawa KozanThe Makuzu workshop (the official kiln name) was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the Kyoto potter Miyagawa Kozan (1842-1916). It initially produced Satsuma-style pottery painted in polychrome enamels and gold, but during the 1880s it focused increasingly on the making of porcelain decorated in Chinese style. Satsuma-style pieces marked 'Kozan' can also be classified as a Makuzu ware or a Yokohama ware. Link to Makuzo ware introduction video.

Pieces are marked Kozan, or Makuzu, or both, marks being drawn or impressed. Kozan I became a Teishitsu Gigeiin or Imperial Artist in 1896, and died in 1916. His first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln in 1912 that was run by him through the early Showa era. In 1917 Hanzan officially took the name Kozan II after one year mourning for his fathers passing.

The Kozan studio produced some of the highest quality ceramics made in Japan and participated in many of the great international expositions in Europe and America during the Meiji era. Among other achievements the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift.

During the areal bombing of Yokohama in 1945 the Makuzu kiln and showroom were completely destroyed.


Maruni & Co
A printed paper label on the base of an item states the name and address to the company as: "Maruni & Co, Isokami Dori 6, Chome, Kobe, Japan. Manufacturer & Dealer in all kinds of porcelain satsuma ware." The material in this set seems to be a white porcelanious stoneware. The mark is a kind of shorthand "Maruni". A circle is maru meaning "round". Sometimes the 'ni' appears within a circle. It appears as if this company continued to operate right up until the WWII or about 1938. After WWII labels with Maruni & Company appears on pieces of lacquer on metal with the addition Made in Occupied Japan and sometimes also the 'CPO' (Central Purchasing Office) meaning bought in to the US army souvenir trade. I have so far not found any porcelain Maruni wares with the addition of "Occupied Japan" or "CPO".
557. Mark: Shimazu family crest over Maruni. Tea or coffee set. "Maruni & Co, Kobe" sicker still under the base. Porcelain. Suggested date mid 1920s.

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1400. Mark: Shimazu family crest over Maru-i commonly Maru meaning "round" or "circular". Pair of vases. Porcelain. Likely date 1920s-30s.

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735. Mark: Maruni. Suggested date mid 1920s.

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Masanobu, see Hododa
Masayoshi
Matsumura
Matsumoto Hozan, see Hozan
Meigado
Meigyokuzan

Meizan (Yabu Tsuneo)
477. Satsuma. Meizan. This mark or a mark in this manner was used by Yabu Tsuneo, Meizan's adopted son, after Meizan's retirement in 1926.

Meizan, Yabu (1853-1934)

The artist Yabu Meizan (1853-1934) had his own studio operating from approx 1880s to 1920s. Extremely high quality decoration. All his work carries his own Yabu Meizan seal, usually in gold. Yabu Meisan (1853-1934) trained in Awaji and Tokyo before setting up shop in Osaka 1880. Retired in 1926. Pices middle to high quality, occasionally exceptional. Exhibited internationally 1889 (Paris) - 1915 (San Francisco).

874. Satsuma "Yabu Meizan" mark from 1904 advertising.

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1141. "Yabu Meizan (1853-1934)", gold mark in double gold lines on brown.

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355. "Yabu Meizan (1853-1934)", gold mark in double gold lines on brown.
466. Mark: Yabu Meizan. Meiji period (1868-1912).

Meizan, workshop
Workshop located in Kanazawa, Kaga prefecture producing good to exceptional work. Worked for Seikozan and can be the actual source for many of their pieces. Differences in calligraphy occurs suggesting that several artists worked under the Meizan name. (Ming Mountain). The Meizan Studio (1880-1920) produced fine quality Satsuma ware, generally signed or impressed Meizan which is not the artist Yabu Meizan.

Meizan
357. Illegible, maybe ... Meizan.

Minatoko
Mitani
Morobayashi, see Meizan
Motodani
Motonubu, Kishuen Motonobu

Nakamura Baikei
Exceptional artist, very rare.

Nambe
478. Satsuma. Mark: Cartouche with Shimazu circular family crest. The left hand column contains the signature, "Nambe"? The central and right hand columns read top to bottom, right to left Dai Nippon, Satsuma yaki. Meiji period (1868-1912)
932. Mark: Nambe. As with many others it is not known whether the name denotes an artist or perhaps a factory/studio mark. Date: Late Meiji 1895-1912 or slightly later

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Naruse, Tokahuen Naruse

Niimura
Nikko
Nikko, Nikko-ya, dealer located in Nagasaki
Ninzan

Nishida, Kyoto
1367. Vase. Mark Dai Nippon, nishi 西 da 田 zo 造 (made), 'right 15' Date: Meiji period (1868-1912), my guess, the later part of Meiji.

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Okahashi

Omura
347. Shimazu family crest; cartouche reads Omura. Taisho period (1912-1926).

Rei or Rai
822. Japanese porcelain in Satsuma style. Shape suggests 1920-30s. Porcelain of this type were made in huge volumes, often in 144 piece sets.

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Risei

Ryokuzan
473. Satsuma. Mark: Ryokuzan. The two left characters are (top to bottom) "tsukuru kore" (ie "made this").
614. Mark: Ryokuzan, Artist: Chin Ju Kan, c. 1868-69.

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Ryozan
885. Japanese porcelain in Satsuma style. Mark: Ryozan. Possible date: around 1920s.

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Ryozan Okamoto 亮山 Yasuda Co.
Ryozan , leading decorator for the Yasuda Company. Style name Ryozan 亮山 (real name Nakamura Tatsunoske) Ryozan Okamoto is the most famous of the artists working for the Yasuda company. See: Yasuda, Ryozan>

Ryudo
Ryu'un

Ryuzan
354. Ryuzan (?), gold mark with separate 'mon', on red. (Illegible). Taisho period (1912-1926). There are also various Kutani Ryuzan (eg Ryuzan Ishino) which would comfortable explain the apparently white porcelain body or the piece.

Seikaku
Seikodo (Seikado?), Saikyo (Kyoto) Seikado zo

Seikozan
An exceptional artist located in Kobe, deducted from early signatures including his location. His finest pieces are exceptional. It has been speculated that several artists might have worked under this name from differences in the calligraphy of the mark.
623. Satsuma. Seikozan sei/tsukuru Late 19th / First half 20th century.

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Seikozan Yasuda Co
472. Satsuma. Seikozan with Satsuma Mon above + Yasuda Co mark below. Meiji period (1868-1912)

Seitoen

Seiya
715. Stamped mark Dai Nippon, seiya zo under a Shimazu family crest. It is generally accepted that marks that includes "Dai Nippon" in Japanese characters on the whole date to the Meiji (1868-1912) period, reflecting the greatly increased nationalism of that period. This mark: Probably c. 1910-30.

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Seizuzan

Seizan 清山
353. Mark: Seizan, red mark. Tentative date: Meiji period (1868-1912)
781. Mark: Shimazu family crest above Seizan. Tentative date c. 1960s

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Seizan

1566. Mark: Seizan, gilt on bronze. Date: Taisho (1913-1926) to early Showa (1926-1988), meaning 1920s to 30s.

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Seizan Gama (Seizan Kiln) 静山窯
727. The two right hand characters read Seizan, the third (left) character reads Gama, meaning 'kiln' as in pottery/ware. In general it seems like the presence of the the word 'Gama' suggests the second half of the 20th century.

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746. The two right hand characters read Seizan, the third (left) character reads Gama, meaning 'kiln' as in pottery/ware. In general it seems like the presence of the the word 'Gama' suggests the second half of the 20th century.

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Sekiaei

Sekizan
622. Shimazu family crest; mark: Sekizan, probably late Taisho (1912-1926).

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Senkai

Senzan
351. SENZAN, gold mark with 'mon' on black. Taisho period (1912-1926).
462. Satsuma. "Senzan"

Sessan
471. Satsuma. Satsuma Sessan Sei. Meiji period (1868-1912)

Setsuzen
350. SETSUZEN, gold mark with 'mon' and JAPAN in gold.

Shibuyazan
Shikai-ichi (See: Furukawa)
Shiroyama (See: Furukawa)

Shizan
344. Shimazu family crest; cartouche appears to read Shizan? Taisho period (1912-1926).

Shogetsu

Shoko Takebe
Little is known about the artist Shoko Takebe besides that he is known to have decorated a number of pieces for the English merchant Thomas Blow. It is possible that an entire dinner service was completed, as a number of various sized plates have been noted. See The Baur Collection (E113,HC) for a pair of vases, also by Takebe and with Blow's name in katakana. Little appears to be known about Takebe's career, although Thomas Blow is known to have worked in Japan during the latter years of the Meiji Period. As a member of the Red Cross, Blow may have assisted with the Loan Exhibition of Japanese Art and Handicraft held in aid of the British Red Cross, October to November 1915.
465. Satsuma. Mark: Shoko Takebe. Meiji period (1868-1912).

Shopo
Shosen

Shozan 章山
Japanese export ware in Satsuma style. Often available in tourist shops and on American military bases in Japan. Although hand painted, factory mass produced, and appearing with several decorator's marks.
1507. Mark: Shozan. Japanese export ware in Satsuma style. Showa period, Post WWII, around 1950-1960s.

Shozan 正山
365. Mark illegible but might be Shozan.

Shozuzan
450. Satsuma. Shozusan (illegible).

Shugetsu
Shuho

Shuzan
1063. Mark: The Shimazu clan mark (Satsuma) above Shuzan zo meaning "Made by Shuzan" with a long u. The top character is shu or "excellent, surpassing", the second is zan (or yama, "mountain"), the third is zo or "made". Date between 1915 to 1925.

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479. Satsuma. Mark: Shuzan
361. Left: Shimazu family crest followed by cartouche reading "Shuzan"; right cartouche reads "Shozan". Meiji period (1868-1912).
463. Satsuma. Mark: Shuzan. Meiji period (1868-1912)

Sodo
Sozan Suwa. Suwa Sozan I (1852-1922)
Sozan, See: Kinkozan
Suizan
Tachibana

Taizan Yohei (1864-1922)
Adopted by the Taizan family in 1878. Transformed their pottery in Kyoto to large factory making Satsuma wares. The first generation of Taizan potters were active at the end of the 1670s. The family specialized in tea utensils, blue glazed pottery, porcelains with celadon glazes and pottery with overglaze enamels. Taizan VII died c. 1875. In 1872 the well-known and important Kyoto manufacturer Taizan VIII started to export of their products together with Kinkozan IV. The company name was Obi-ya or Obi-ya where 'tai' is another reading of the character 'Obi'. Takahashi Yohei, Go (art name) Taizan, was the head of the 9th and last generation of the Takahashi family of Awata potters. Under him the family produced mainly for the export market, in particular to America where his products were much sought after. The Taizan kiln appears to have closed around 1894. However in 1895 and 1901 reports have it that Taizan is still working "on a comparatively small scale". The production seems to have been maintained until 9th Taizan (Yohei) died in 1922. During the end of the Meiji period and into Taisho, Taizan decorated blanks from Kinkozan, Izumo Wakayama, etc. Pieces occurs that has both Kinkozan and Taizan markings where generally the Kinkozan mark is impressed in the piece itself and the Taizan mark is written. The firing of enamel decoration is an uncomplicated process compared to firing ceramics and could have been done anywhere. In 1922 the 9th Taizan Yohei died, putting an end to the production.
467. Satsuma. Dai Nippon Taizan Sei. This mark: Meiji period (1868-1912)
1268. Impressed mark: Taizan. Date: Meiji period (1868-1912), around 1905-1910 in age.

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1269. Impressed mark: Taizan. Date: Meiji period (1868-1912), around 1875-1890 in age.

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1270. Mark: Taizan. Date: Meiji period (1868-1912), around 1910 in age.

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1271. Mark: Dai Nippon Taizan Sei. Date: Meiji period (1868-1912), tentative date c. 1880.

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1273. Mark: Dai Nippon Taizan Sei. Date: Meiji period (1868-1912), Taizan Yohei IX, tentative date c. 1880.

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1272. Mark: Dai Nippon Taizan Sei. Date: Meiji period (1868-1912), Taizan Yohei IX.

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1274. Mark: Dai Nippon Taizan Sei. Date: Meiji period (1868-1912), Taizan Yohei IX. Tentative date, late Meiji.

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533. Mark: Dai nippon Taizan sei

Takeuchi
464. Satsuma. Mark: "Takeuchi". Cartouche with Shimazu circular family crest above name.

Tanaka
Taniguchi
Tanshu
Tanzan

Tashino
687. Mark Tashino zo. Possibly late 20th century.

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Tashiro
Tohozan
Tokozan

Tomo
1086. Mark: Below the circular Shimazu crest, a single kanji character Tomo, "companion". Date: Meiji (1868-1912) period, 1868-1900.

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Toyama

Tozan Ito, Ito Tozan (1846-1920)
Tozan Ito established business I Kyoto 1867. Made table wares and earthenware in Satsuma style.

Tsunenobu

Uchida 内田
345. Cartouche reads Uchida. Date: Taisho to Showa period.

Umekokoro, Ume kokoro
Urazakiyama
Yabu Meizan, see Meizan

Yasuda (Trademark) Yasuda Kyoto Tokiji Goshigaisha
Yasuda is a trademark. There were several artists working with Yasuda Kyoto Tokiji Goshigaisha. The best known & most regarded of the artists working for this company was Ryozan 亮山 and Seikozan. The thing to keep in mind with Yasuda is that apart from possibly Yabu Meizan whose output maintained a very high standard, most of the producers varied in quality, some great some so so.

Yasuda trademark, Hozan
1562. Mark: Hozan, under the Yasuda trademark. When signed in full it reads Matsumoto Hozan. Some of his work is of very high quality.

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Yasuda trademark, Kizan
Yasuda trademark, Kozan
Yasuda trademark, Nikkozan

Yasuda trademark, Ryozan 亮山
1275. Mark: Dai Nippon, Yasuda, Ryozan 亮山
1315. Mark: Ryozan 亮山 and a Yasuda Trading Company mark over the Shimazu clan marking of a cross and a circle.

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Yasuda trademark, Seikozan
472. Satsuma ware. Mark from top to bottom: The circle and cross Satsuma Mon, the signature of Seikozan artist, and below, Yasuda Co trademark. Meiji period (1868-1912). Mark listed here as an example of the Yasuda trade mark. Beside this, see the respective artists.

Yasuda trademark, Shuzan
Yasuda trademark, Yuzan
Yasui
Yoshi
Yoshinobu
Yosuke Matsuzawa (Satsuma dealer)
Yozan
Yuzan, Ichiryusha Yuzan
Zuisensai

Unidentified marks - Help appreciated
1321. Tea set, Mark: 1321. Mark: Naganune Sei. Dragon ware with lithophane, probably decorated in Hong Kong. Tentative date 1960s.

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1228. Vase. Mark: 1228. Mark: Okadake. Tentative date Meiji period (1868-1912).

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529. Satsuma. Two characters to the right - Nippon, Two central characters - Satsuma, Two left hand characters - yaki i.e. product, Final character ... ?

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710. Mark: Dai Nippon Tsuizan Satsuma Yaki Choshufusi Sei. Satsuma.

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711. Mark: Meigyekudo. Satsuma.

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762. Mark: Dai Nippon Tsukuru, Masatane, followed by a kakihan. It is generally accepted that marks that includes "Dai Nippon" in Japanese characters on the whole date to the Meiji (1868-1912) period, reflecting the greatly increased nationalism of that period.

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811. Japanese porcelain figure. Mark: Red stamped 'Shimazu' crest and "Made in Occupied Japan". Date 'OJ' period (1945-52).

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490. Dai Nippon Koda tsukuru, or Dai Nippon Mukoda tsukuru. The characters to the right and on the rim says "right(-most) box" 右盒. Satsuma pottery of the Kyoto School. Popular export ware. Late Edo/Early Meiji period 1868-1912 c. 1865.

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615. Dai Nippon ... tsukuru. It is generally accepted that marks that includes "Dai Nippon" in Japanese characters on the whole date to the Meiji (1868-1912) period, reflecting the greatly increased nationalism of that period. This mark tentatively. Late 19th / First half 20th century.

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468. Satsuma. Right hand line reads Dai Nippon. Bottom left character is "zo".
873. Mark: "Right 右, 5". Japanese porcelain. Satsuma looking ware. Possible 1920-30.

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821. Mark: "Right 右, 6". Japanese porcelain. Satsuma looking ware. Possible 1920-30.
971. Mark: "Right 右, 10". Possible a mark indicating the place of the vase within a set. Japanese porcelain. Satsuma looking ware. Possible 1920-30.

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970. Mark: "Right 右, 14". Possible a mark indicating the place of the vase within a set. Japanese porcelain. Satsuma looking ware. Possible 1920-30.

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1240. Mark: "Right" 右 plus a character possible "Gold". Kyoto Satsuma ware. Date: Family history suggests 1950s.

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741. Tentative date c. 1910s.

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486.
174. First half of the 20th century. Satsuma looking crackled glazed pottery.
1092. Shimazu family crest and makers signature. Tentative date around 1940s.

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The gotheborg.com marks page was originally initiated by a donation of marks from the collection of Karl-Hans Schneider, Euskirchen, Germany in July 2000. The section have since then been greatly extended by a large number of contributing collectors. A big thank you goes among others to Sandra Andacht who are to be credited with some of the good information that makes this page interesting. Additional translations by John Wocher and I & M Heriot.